PCB Notification

posted Apr 2, 2012, 11:18 AM by mohammed islam   [ updated Apr 2, 2012, 11:18 AM ]
4/2/2012

Dear School Community:

Last year, we announced a comprehensive plan to replace lighting fixtures containing (polychlorinated biphenyls) PCBs in schools. PCBs were used in new and upgraded buildings across the country between 1950 and 1978, including schools. In 1978, the federal government banned the manufacture of PCBs in building materials but, until recently, provided little guidance on how to identify and handle materials in existing buildings that may have PCBs.

Last July, New York City began a ten-year comprehensive plan to remove PCB-containing fixtures and install new lighting retrofits, free of PCBs. The plan will also increase the energy efficiency and environmental quality of City school buildings. Our work will take place outside of school hours, to minimize the disruption to students and staff.

We are sending this letter to inform you that our school building has been identified as having lighting fixtures that are likely to include PCB-containing materials, in a component known as a lighting ballast. Therefore, we will be receiving a PCB-free lighting retrofit at some point during the next nine years. To see a list of buildings where lighting replacement work is in progress as well as a list of buildings where such work has been completed, go to http://www.nycsca.org/Community/Programs/EPA-NYC-PCB/Pages/default.aspx (in English only).

It is important to emphasize that there is no immediate health risk to the occupants of school buildings with PCB-containing lighting ballasts. The City’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) has advised that there is no immediate health concern; health effects from long-term exposure to the air in school buildings are unlikely to occur at the PCB levels seen in City schools. Additionally, in a New York Times article on this issue, doctors from Mount Sinai School of Medicine stated, “PCBs at the levels found in most schools in New York City today will not make any child or any teacher acutely ill. In fact, compared with air levels reported in some other studies, air levels reported in NYC schools have been quite low.”

The DOE is actively working with its schools to address this issue and will keep us updated as the retrofitting plan is implemented at our building. Please visit the DOE’s website if you have further questions. http://www.nycsca.org/Community/Programs/EPA-NYC-PCB/Pages/default.aspx (in English only).

Sincerely,

Anita Mannien-Felix,Principal
Ċ
mohammed islam,
Apr 2, 2012, 11:18 AM
Ċ
mohammed islam,
Apr 2, 2012, 11:18 AM
Ċ
mohammed islam,
Apr 2, 2012, 11:18 AM
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